Winter projects

We’ve certainly had our share of winter weather this year, but that hasn’t stopped us from working on some new projects. In January we started a new batch of shiitake mushroom logs, and we are expanding oyster mushroom production this year as well. Our market season doesn’t start back up until late April, but we’ve already got the first round of seedlings started in the greenhouse.  If you’ve missed our eggs at the market, you might be able to find a dozen at Little House Green Grocery, along with a ton of other local goodies.  Winter is also the perfect time to sign up for a share in our CSA. All the details and the registration form for 2014 can be found here.

Gus inoculating logs with shiitake mushroom spawn.

Gus inoculating logs with shiitake mushroom spawn.

Teal with the new shiitake logs.

Teal with the new shiitake logs.

Eggs from our flock of laying hens.

Eggs from our flock of laying hens.

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Summer Recap

Now that all the fall plants are in the ground and things have started to slow down a little bit around here, I figured it was a good time to reflect on the summer. June, July and August were extremely wet and rainy which presented some challenges. Wet weather means blights and mildews spread more quickly, and even though the plants enjoy the extra water, so do the weeds. Despite the weather, we harvested some beautiful veggies this summer, and more fall crops are on their way.  Our chickens started laying eggs in August, so keep an eye out for them at market. They have been eating a steady diet of GMO-free feed from Sunrise Farms in Stuarts Draft, VA, market left-overs, and whatever goodies they can scratch up around the farm.

nestbox

A chicken sitting in her nest box.

Green onions, ready for market.

Green onions, ready for market.

This baby Box Turtle hatched on the farm.

This baby Box Turtle hatched on the farm.

Sunflower.

Sunflower.

Chickens!

It sure has been busy on the farm, so busy we haven’t even introduced our new laying hens!  A little over a month ago these were little more than tiny balls of fluff, but now they are maturing into real chickens.  Our new flock is a mixture of three breeds: Barred Rocks, Rhode Island Reds, and Easter Eggers. We hope that by early fall these ladies will be providing us and the farmers’ market with fresh eggs.

A lovely Barred Rock hen.

A lovely Barred Rock hen.

Day-old chicks in the brooder.

Day-old chicks in the brooder.

Teeny tiny chicken.

Teeny tiny chicken.