Brrrr!

It sure has been a chilly February, but that hasn’t kept us away from farm work. At the end of January we attended the annual Virginia Association for Biological Farming conference. It was a great opportunity for us to get re-energized for the coming farming season, and to chat with other sustainable farmers from around the state (you can find out all the other great things VABF does by checking out their website, vabf.org). Another thing that gets us excited for the coming season is the arrival of all the seeds we ordered! This year we ended up with way more carrot seeds that we planned for, with one packet as a free gift, and one that was sent to us by accident. Combined with our brand new flame weeder, maybe this will be the year we finally kick some butt growing carrots! In addition to all the edible seeds, we also ordered a ton of flowers and herbs to create a mix of plants to attract beneficial insects. We’ll plant this around the edge of the farm to create habitat for good predatory bugs and provide consistent food for our honey bees and other native pollinators. The threat of heavy snow and record cold temperatures convinced us to delay starting some of our early season plants, but we’ve finally got the greenhouse fired up and it’s starting to feel like spring! Now is the perfect time to sign up for a share in our CSA for 2015. We still have spaces available for pickups in both Richmond, VA and from the farm in Quinton. Click here for all the details.

Some of the seeds we ordered for this year.

Some of the seeds we ordered for this year.

ricosnow2

Rico, our farm dog, playing in the snow.

2014 in Review

The 2014 farming season was a whirlwind of activity that left little time for contemplation. Looking back at the photos taken during the summer is a vivid reminder of the amazing produce we grew, and how green Virginia was even a few months ago.  We trialed some crazy looking tomatoes this year, many of which will be making a return for 2015. Our bees did great things for our squash and cucumber crops, and the fall weather was perfect for radishes and turnips. We’ve been busy making our field plan for next year, a task that really starts even before the last produce is out of the ground in the fall. We’ve got lots of exciting things in the works for 2015, and one of best ways to experience them first hand is through our community supported agriculture program. Shares are now available for 2015, and you can find all the details by clicking here.

Funky and delicious tomatoes!

Funky and delicious tomatoes!

Squash at the market.

Squash at the market.

Fall radishes.

Fall radishes.

Busy as a Bee

Now that the danger of frost has passed for this spring, we’ve really kicked it into high gear on the farm. The greenhouse is full of gorgeous plants and our direct seeded crops are starting to flourish in the warmer weather. We’ve been keeping busy, and so have our new bees! This spring we installed a hive of honey bees to help out with pollination on the farm. Many plants that we grow are self pollinating, or only require pollination to make viable seeds but will still make a fruit. The plants in the squash family need pollination from insects, such as honey bees, or else they won’t produce fruit at all. We’re hoping that more bees means more squash, cucumbers, and melons this year. If we’re lucky we might also get to harvest some honey from them at the end of the season. Honey bees are amazing creatures and we’re glad to have them adding to the biodiversity of the farm.

In other news: There are still shares available in our 2014 CSA. Click here to learn more. Also, farmers markets are starting back up for the season and you can  find us at the Carytown Farmers Market every Sunday 11am-3pm, and starting the weekend of May 3rd we’ll be at the South of the James Farmers Market in Forrest Hill Park every Saturday 8am-noon.

Teal opening the bee hive.

Teal opening the bee hive.

One of our new bees collecting pollen.

One of our new bees collecting pollen.

Cabbages in the greenhouse.

Cabbages in the greenhouse.

 

Winter projects

We’ve certainly had our share of winter weather this year, but that hasn’t stopped us from working on some new projects. In January we started a new batch of shiitake mushroom logs, and we are expanding oyster mushroom production this year as well. Our market season doesn’t start back up until late April, but we’ve already got the first round of seedlings started in the greenhouse.  If you’ve missed our eggs at the market, you might be able to find a dozen at Little House Green Grocery, along with a ton of other local goodies.  Winter is also the perfect time to sign up for a share in our CSA. All the details and the registration form for 2014 can be found here.

Gus inoculating logs with shiitake mushroom spawn.

Gus inoculating logs with shiitake mushroom spawn.

Teal with the new shiitake logs.

Teal with the new shiitake logs.

Eggs from our flock of laying hens.

Eggs from our flock of laying hens.

Summer Recap

Now that all the fall plants are in the ground and things have started to slow down a little bit around here, I figured it was a good time to reflect on the summer. June, July and August were extremely wet and rainy which presented some challenges. Wet weather means blights and mildews spread more quickly, and even though the plants enjoy the extra water, so do the weeds. Despite the weather, we harvested some beautiful veggies this summer, and more fall crops are on their way.  Our chickens started laying eggs in August, so keep an eye out for them at market. They have been eating a steady diet of GMO-free feed from Sunrise Farms in Stuarts Draft, VA, market left-overs, and whatever goodies they can scratch up around the farm.

nestbox

A chicken sitting in her nest box.

Green onions, ready for market.

Green onions, ready for market.

This baby Box Turtle hatched on the farm.

This baby Box Turtle hatched on the farm.

Sunflower.

Sunflower.

Farmers Markets and CSA

Farmers market season is in full swing now, and you can find us at two Richmond,VA farmers markets: South of the James Market on Saturdays (8am-12pm) in Forest Hill Park, or at the Carytown Market on Sundays (11am-3pm) in the Wells Fargo parking lot at the corner of W. Cary and Auburn.  This spring has brought the perfect weather for greens, so stop by the market and try one of our three varieties of kale! Our shiitake logs have also been enjoying the wet weather and have provided us with a fantastic harvest of mushrooms. If you need a little inspiration for how to cook your ‘shrooms then head over to River City Good Eats and see what Michele Humlan prepared, looks delicious! Next weekend is the first pickup for our Community Supported Agriculture program, and it’s not too late to join, check out the CSA page for more info and the registration form!

Pine Fork Farm tent at the Carytown Farmers Market.

Our tent at the Carytown Farmers Market.

Fruiting shiitake mushroom logs.

Fruiting shiitake mushroom logs.

Snap pea blossoms.

Snap pea blossoms.

Chickens!

It sure has been busy on the farm, so busy we haven’t even introduced our new laying hens!  A little over a month ago these were little more than tiny balls of fluff, but now they are maturing into real chickens.  Our new flock is a mixture of three breeds: Barred Rocks, Rhode Island Reds, and Easter Eggers. We hope that by early fall these ladies will be providing us and the farmers’ market with fresh eggs.

A lovely Barred Rock hen.

A lovely Barred Rock hen.

Day-old chicks in the brooder.

Day-old chicks in the brooder.

Teeny tiny chicken.

Teeny tiny chicken.